FAQ

Research shows that a large majority of SSI/SSDI cases are denied upon application and require additional appeals and/or a hearing. Although the informality of the hearings makes it possible for some claimants to represent themselves, statistics have shown that people represented by attorneys have been successful more often than people without attorney representation. Whether you hire an attorney is entirely up to you, but you are significantly increasing your odds of being approved for benefits if you hire the right attorney to assist you.

SSI and SSDI are disability benefit programs run by Social Security Administration (SSA). Both programs pay monthly cash benefits to people with disabilities that will last twelve (12) months and who cannot maintain substantial and gainful employment. To get SSI and SSDI benefits, you must be disabled under SSA rules.

It is important for you to develop your case as accurately and completely as possible. These are some of the areas that SSA will take into account as you are reviewed for disability benefits. Being as thorough as possible on the areas below is critical for strengthening your case:

  • Medical Condition(s)
  • Medical History
  • Medical Records
  • Physical Abilities
  • Education and Training
  • Post Relevant Work Experience

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